Book Review Sunny by Jason Reynolds

Check out this book review on Sunny by Jason Reynolds from 2 Peas and a Dog. #yalit #languagearts #reading #2peasandadog

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Sunny by Jason Reynolds was an exciting surprise I received in my mailbox. I received an Advance Reader’s Copy of this novel as part of a YA Blogger promotion from Simon & Schuster Canada. All opinions are my own, and I was not additionally compensated for this post beyond the complimentary novel.

Jason Reynolds’ newest novel Sunny is a great addition to every middle school classroom library. I got access to the novel as an advance reader’s copy and enjoyed every minute.

Summary

Sunny is a gifted runner who seems like your average middle school kid – except that he thinks he killed his mother. Within the first few pages of the book, Sunny admits that his mother’s death during childbirth was his fault. Sunny is also homeschooled by an eccentric teacher who takes him on weekly adventures that help him discover more about himself and who he wants to be. All of this combined with his tumultuous relationship with his father make this a book your students won’t put down.

Review

Right away your students will be hooked by Sunny’s omission of his inner thoughts. It is also written in a diary/journal format which makes it easy to read for all readers. This the third book in the Track Series by Jason Reynolds. I cannot keep this series in my classroom library. It gets passed around from student to student without ever getting signed back into my library. From strong readers to reluctant readers this book and series will get them actually reading. If you can’t get this book for your classroom library, ask your school or public library to purchase this series – Ghost, Patina, and Sunny. The content is appropriate for Grades 6 – 8 students without any issues of overly mature subject matter or inappropriate words which is also a concern with YA fiction.

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Book Review: Patina by Jason Reynolds

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